ALVARO PULPEIRO

Bio

Alvaro Fernandez Pulpeiro

Alvaro Fernandez Pulpeiro: “I was born in a Galician fishing village that goes by the name of Foz in 1990. Moved to São Luis of Maranhão from 2004 to 2006, returned to Spain in order to finish my high school studies. In 2008 moved again, but this time to Perth, in Western Australia, where I, disillusioned with Spanish education, decided to find work as anything and to do little trips around the western coast. After one year, I enrolled in the Architecture course at the Curtin University in Perth. In 2010, I applied to the Architectural Association School of Architecture in London. After three years, I am now undergoing a third year project, under the tutorage of Ricardo de Ostos and Nanette Jackowski (intermediate 3), that is dealing with Amazonian jungle in relation to the ones that wonder too deep, the fever-dreamer); the product that comes out of this struggle and how it is manifested and expressed in my main interest. If in the XV century, ink on paper was the way to express what overwhelms any coherent system, now I am using the pedantic qualities of the Broadcast as a language that betrays itself and becomes, at the end, self-referential due to its obvious detachment from the real and the impossibility of conveying a live sensation dependent of such an intense place like the Amazon. A landscape of operatic emotional outbursts. Recent Projects include An architectural conflict in the Seagram Building (2010), The Wishful Thinker of the Salton Sea, California (2011-12), The Kärtner Bar, Adolf Loos. From 1812 to 1908 and post 2008 critical Europe (2012) and Digital Operas from the Amazon (2012-13).

http://anamazonianvoyage.tumblr.com/

ALVARO PULPEIRO-DigitalOperas

ALVARO PULPEIRO-planted

ALVARO PULPEIRO ON THE 89+ GENERATION

“-Everything seems to be at hand, from antique tragedy to recipes.

-Information is consumed yet never digested.

-We are an all-knowing generation without the knowledge to act upon what we know; there is a lack of belief about what is actually known.

-They tell us consumables are easy and fast to use, and the ability to access them lies at our fingertips.

-Computers are obviously inseparable from us, even after death.

-It is said that our feelings and sensations are scrambled like a YouTube roulette session; cats, Kardashian, KKK and Giles Deleuze all talk through the same channel … preferably for no longer than 2:35 minutes.

And all this is widely accepted, smiled at, but we, the generation that claims to have fully integrated the digital media and its multiple interfaces into our daily lives, are still totally detached from its language; we only play with it like a dog plays with a ball – there is still passivity in relation to the medium. We are not the generation of the internet as a world language; we are the bridge between the an analogue past and a digitalised future (both ghosts). Perhaps we’ll be the ones who will finally come up with the creative manifestations that can and will define a human being not through the sterility of futuristic techno-utopias, but through a radical new world language that will develop into true and previously unknown sensations and feelings.”